Category Archives: feminist

gift guide for cranky fat feminists!

Gift ideas for the holidays, for all of the cranky feminists in your life (fat or slim)! This is a gift guide in progress, so don’t forget to check back for more great finds!

books I recommend!

Fatropolis will take you away to an alternate world where big is beautiful. Hiding your body is unnecessary. Shopping for clothes is easy. Eating your fill isn’t embarrassing. If you’re a fat woman (or man!) this is a book you don’t want to miss! (age appropriate for high schoolers as well)

Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide is a book to not read lightly. It’s important work, it’s an important read, but it comes with a giant trigger warning. Amazon says “…a passionate call to arms against our era’s most pervasive human rights violation: the oppression of women and girls in the developing world. One chapter at a time, this is an important read.

Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic is a graphic novel depicting Alison Bechdel’s childhood, adolescence, and discovery of her sexuality. She shows us her vulnerabilities, her family problems, and her journey to adulthood. I’ve read this several times, and highly recommend!

Persepolis: The Story of a Childhood is a graphic novel depicting Marjane Satrapi’s coming of age in Iran during the Islamic Revolution. Don’t miss this! (also age appropriate for high schoolers)

buying books instead of drinks

my wishlist!

On my personal wishlist is Sex Object: a Memoir, by Jessica Valenti. Amazon says “Valenti explores the toll that sexism takes on women’s lives, from the everyday to the existential. From subway gropings and imposter syndrome to sexual awakenings and motherhood, Sex Object reveals the painful, embarrassing, and sometimes illegal moments that shaped Valenti’s adolescence and young adulthood in New York City.”

Fresh off the press, Feminist Fight Club: an Office Survival Manual for a Sexist Workplace, by Jessica Bennett is also on my wishlist. Here’s why: “Part manual, part manifesto, Feminist Fight Club is a hilarious yet incisive guide to navigating subtle sexism at work, providing real-life career advice and humorous reinforcement for a new generation of professional women… Hard-hitting and entertaining, Feminist Fight Club blends personal stories with research, statistics, and no-bullsh*t expert advice. Bennett offers a new vocabulary for the sexist workplace archetypes women encounter everyday.”

Fight Like a Girl introduces readers to the history of feminist activism in the U.S. in an effort to celebrate those who paved the way and draw attention to those who are working hard to further the feminist cause today.” How could this not be on my list of books to read and give?!

Rad Women Worldwide: Artists and Athletes, Pirates and Punks, and Other Revolutionaries Who Shaped History features 40 women from 31 countries around the world. There’s also a list of 250 additional rad women to check out on your own. Get inspired, or inspire others with this awesome collection!

strong women

 

coloring books on my wishlist!

The Yoni Coloring Book is an awesome gift for anyone you know that loves to color, or would enjoy creating crazy colored vulvas! The illustrator is part of our CFF community.

The Ruth Bader Ginsburg Coloring Book: A Tribute to the Always Colorful and Often Inspiring Life of the Supreme Court Justice Known as RBG. Need I say more than “notorious RBG coloring book!”? <3

 

 

**disclaimer! I may receive a commission from purchases made via these links**

[feminist] your next coloring book! The Yoni Coloring Book

Your next coloring book! You know that you or a friend definitely needs this, and it was drawn by one of our CFFs! (also, if you purchase through this Amazon link, I’ll get a commission. this is totally a win-win-win situation) Remember, every vulva is unique, wonderful, and special. Every vagina is incredible and has the potential to be a canal of life. Now you can color 22 of them however you’d like!

Yoni is the Sanskrit word for womb or sacred passage—and what better way to consider this most sacred part of a woman’s body than in this goddess-like aspect? With 22 different hand-drawn designs by artist H.L. Brooks, this coloring book celebrates the yoni both as a symbol of womanhood and also as a highly individual form—unique to every woman and each beautiful in her own way.

The Yoni Coloring Book: For Your Inner and Outer Goddess

yoni -oloring-book-crankyfatfeminist-vagina-vulva

Learn more and check out surprise pages from inside the book!

**disclaimer! I may receive a commission from items purchased through the above link!

 

[feminist] wacky women earrings!

women earrings

Wacky Women Earrings are $6 a pair, and $2 of that will go to the Planned Parenthood Action Fund (of the Southeast).

If you order 2 pairs, you’ll save $1 each! (don’t forget, free gift wrapping is always available, just let me know!)

women earrings close up

 

quantity
bead color/shape preference

Rather buy through Etsy?  www.etsy.com/listing/281373898/woman-earrings-with-abstract-beads-plus

Hello WordPress! (and Welcome!)

I’ve moved Cranky Fat Feminist from Google’s Blogger to WordPress, and it’s still a work in progress.

Posts written in 2015 have been updated, and hopefully by the end of July the blog will be beautiful and full updated! Don’t forget, if you know the original artist/site for an image please let me know so that I can give proper credit where credit is due. Right now comments require an extra step to keep out spammers, but I still LOVE comments and want to hear from you!

If you have tips, suggestions, images, topics….. shoot me an email at crankyfatfeminist (@gmail.com).

I’m also working on monetizing the blog more, so that each time you click on an ad I get a bit of money, and each time you click on certain links (they’ll be marked) I’ll get a commission from your purchases. This will allow me to spend more time blogging, as well as more time troll-banning, without costing you a penny.

Thanks for being an online family for me! I am always learning, and I love the support that we provide each other.

<3 Cranky

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[cranky] CFF manifesto (in progress)

CFF became a place for me to understand that there is more than fat shaming — there is skinny shaming too, and that I’ve participated in it. Today, I do post mostly about fat shaming, but I make a point of never skinny shaming.

gabourey sidibe

I’ve also reflected a lot on how I’ve felt fat since probably the age of 9 or 10. I hit puberty early (period came at age 10) so I was extra tall and hairy early. I’ve always had wide shoulders, and by 6th grade I was a 36C. I was always bigger than every other girl, and most of the guys. I told myself constantly that I was fat. Middle school (the years of self hate, mean girls, exploring make up, leg shaving, girl on girl hate…) only made my fat feel fatter.
Since then I’ve realized that almost all of us felt fat (regardless of how little we may have weighed). I want this page to be a community in which everyone who has ever felt fat — ever — to feel safe and realize that we must love our bodies. Even if you want to change your body (weight, gender, tattoos, clothes) you have to start by loving your body.

You only get one body.

strong women

Every day when I check CFF I’m reminded that I MUST love my wonderfully imperfect body. I am reminded the true meaning and importance of intersectionality, looking through comments and looking at all of the countries and cities the “likes” originate from.

This then reminds me that all over the world fat means different things. When I was in Ghana fat was a good thing (although personally traumatic for the first six weeks). We must accept our bodies, love our bodies, and remember that maybe it’s your society that does not “approve” of your body — but it’s not the world that does not approve.
she dares to take up space

I love messages from other CFFs, and posts shared on the wall. It helps open my eyes more to the world outside of my little ass-backwards southern city.

I somehow was incredibly sheltered from the fact that men have body image issues as well. Having CFF really opened my eyes to this, and I’ve worked my hardest to include all genders in body image conversations. My own father’s body image problems have also been eye opening. He weighs much less than me, but is desperate to lose 20 pounds. His doctor hasn’t asked him to lose weight, it’s just for him and the man he sees in the mirror. While I don’t understand it, I still have to respect him.

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Always a work in progress, respect and choice are essential to feminism.