Category Archives: manifesto

gift guide for cranky fat feminists!

Gift ideas for the holidays, for all of the cranky feminists in your life (fat or slim)! This is a gift guide in progress, so don’t forget to check back for more great finds!

books I recommend!

Fatropolis will take you away to an alternate world where big is beautiful. Hiding your body is unnecessary. Shopping for clothes is easy. Eating your fill isn’t embarrassing. If you’re a fat woman (or man!) this is a book you don’t want to miss! (age appropriate for high schoolers as well)

Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide is a book to not read lightly. It’s important work, it’s an important read, but it comes with a giant trigger warning. Amazon says “…a passionate call to arms against our era’s most pervasive human rights violation: the oppression of women and girls in the developing world. One chapter at a time, this is an important read.

Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic is a graphic novel depicting Alison Bechdel’s childhood, adolescence, and discovery of her sexuality. She shows us her vulnerabilities, her family problems, and her journey to adulthood. I’ve read this several times, and highly recommend!

Persepolis: The Story of a Childhood is a graphic novel depicting Marjane Satrapi’s coming of age in Iran during the Islamic Revolution. Don’t miss this! (also age appropriate for high schoolers)

buying books instead of drinks

my wishlist!

On my personal wishlist is Sex Object: a Memoir, by Jessica Valenti. Amazon says “Valenti explores the toll that sexism takes on women’s lives, from the everyday to the existential. From subway gropings and imposter syndrome to sexual awakenings and motherhood, Sex Object reveals the painful, embarrassing, and sometimes illegal moments that shaped Valenti’s adolescence and young adulthood in New York City.”

Fresh off the press, Feminist Fight Club: an Office Survival Manual for a Sexist Workplace, by Jessica Bennett is also on my wishlist. Here’s why: “Part manual, part manifesto, Feminist Fight Club is a hilarious yet incisive guide to navigating subtle sexism at work, providing real-life career advice and humorous reinforcement for a new generation of professional women… Hard-hitting and entertaining, Feminist Fight Club blends personal stories with research, statistics, and no-bullsh*t expert advice. Bennett offers a new vocabulary for the sexist workplace archetypes women encounter everyday.”

Fight Like a Girl introduces readers to the history of feminist activism in the U.S. in an effort to celebrate those who paved the way and draw attention to those who are working hard to further the feminist cause today.” How could this not be on my list of books to read and give?!

Rad Women Worldwide: Artists and Athletes, Pirates and Punks, and Other Revolutionaries Who Shaped History features 40 women from 31 countries around the world. There’s also a list of 250 additional rad women to check out on your own. Get inspired, or inspire others with this awesome collection!

strong women

 

coloring books on my wishlist!

The Yoni Coloring Book is an awesome gift for anyone you know that loves to color, or would enjoy creating crazy colored vulvas! The illustrator is part of our CFF community.

The Ruth Bader Ginsburg Coloring Book: A Tribute to the Always Colorful and Often Inspiring Life of the Supreme Court Justice Known as RBG. Need I say more than “notorious RBG coloring book!”? <3

 

 

**disclaimer! I may receive a commission from purchases made via these links**

“why are you scared of a Trump Presidency?”

My parents both (separately) asked in a shocked tone of voice “why are you scared?!” of a Trump presidency. So, I’m making a list. I check email, write a bullet-list note or two, pour a fresh cup of coffee, write another. Check Facebook, and discover that numerous friend of friends have already seen/experienced racism, xenophobia, sexism, all in the name of Trump. #whitepower #whitesonly #whiteamerica Teachers are talking about their students’ fear, and their terrible acts of racism and sexism.

its not just about trump

I saw it on TV, so it must be okay. The man my parents elected president says/does these things without repercussion, so I can too.

I cringe repeating this, but a few hours ago I said “I’m so glad I’m white.” Because it means I’m not being targeted by racist douchebags who think its acceptable and funny to harass and threaten others. I am a straight white woman, so at least until January I am not “other.” Which means that I need to step up my game in being an ally. Let me walk with you to your car, sit next to you on the bus or metro. Let me stand with you while we both tell racist xenophobic sexist bigots to go fuck themselves. We must move beyond comfortable couch activism and into active ally-ship and activism.

presidential election

Trump’s “first 100 days”

I’ve read Trump’s “1st 100 days plan” three times. Once with my friend/coworker/sanity/feminist… we had a few “okay, I can get with that” moments, some “people care about this shit?!” moments, progressing to “uh, Congress won’t go for that” “the government doesn’t work like that” and finally “he knows there is only one planet, right?” (Yes, my written critique of his ideas in currently in the works.) You can read his plan here.

ruin a man's career

I despise Trump and his hate. His language and behavior and rhetoric have no place in DC. I’m not afraid of Trump’s policies– I’m afraid of Mike Pence and his friends in Congress picking the worst policies to make into law, and twisting them into irreversibly fucked plans that harm all but the 1%. We will have Supreme Court Justices that will uphold this bigoted shit, and overturn what we, our mothers, and grandmothers have fought so hard for.

Trump doesn’t understand how the government works.
do you?

If you voted for Trump in order to get Congressional term limits, lobbying reform, or overturn Citizens United, then you do not know how our government works. (Trump obviously doesn’t know either.)

trump war

Some say “oh, he’ll have an impeachable offense, then all will be well!” No, it won’t.  Congress would love to impeach Trump, Mike Pence is their good friend. Every good thing Obama and Bill Clinton did may be erased in the next four years. Everything the Supreme Court has afforded us in the last 50 years is up for debate and dismantling. Mike Pence and Paul Ryan both have a history of hate-filled policies against women, queer people, reproductive rights, and minorities. It will be their pleasure to destroy the rights of everyone that’s not a white hetero male within the top financial 10% of America.

sheep     

I so badly want someone to blame (3rd party voters, protest voters, purposeful non-voters, uninterested non-voters….) but it really doesn’t matter. We have to move forward with the hand we’ve been dealt. We must learn to become active allies, and we must be ready to march and protest peacefully at any time to defend our rights.

[cranky] CFF manifesto (in progress)

CFF became a place for me to understand that there is more than fat shaming — there is skinny shaming too, and that I’ve participated in it. Today, I do post mostly about fat shaming, but I make a point of never skinny shaming.

gabourey sidibe

I’ve also reflected a lot on how I’ve felt fat since probably the age of 9 or 10. I hit puberty early (period came at age 10) so I was extra tall and hairy early. I’ve always had wide shoulders, and by 6th grade I was a 36C. I was always bigger than every other girl, and most of the guys. I told myself constantly that I was fat. Middle school (the years of self hate, mean girls, exploring make up, leg shaving, girl on girl hate…) only made my fat feel fatter.
Since then I’ve realized that almost all of us felt fat (regardless of how little we may have weighed). I want this page to be a community in which everyone who has ever felt fat — ever — to feel safe and realize that we must love our bodies. Even if you want to change your body (weight, gender, tattoos, clothes) you have to start by loving your body.

You only get one body.

strong women

Every day when I check CFF I’m reminded that I MUST love my wonderfully imperfect body. I am reminded the true meaning and importance of intersectionality, looking through comments and looking at all of the countries and cities the “likes” originate from.

This then reminds me that all over the world fat means different things. When I was in Ghana fat was a good thing (although personally traumatic for the first six weeks). We must accept our bodies, love our bodies, and remember that maybe it’s your society that does not “approve” of your body — but it’s not the world that does not approve.
she dares to take up space

I love messages from other CFFs, and posts shared on the wall. It helps open my eyes more to the world outside of my little ass-backwards southern city.

I somehow was incredibly sheltered from the fact that men have body image issues as well. Having CFF really opened my eyes to this, and I’ve worked my hardest to include all genders in body image conversations. My own father’s body image problems have also been eye opening. He weighs much less than me, but is desperate to lose 20 pounds. His doctor hasn’t asked him to lose weight, it’s just for him and the man he sees in the mirror. While I don’t understand it, I still have to respect him.

pretty

Always a work in progress, respect and choice are essential to feminism.